Educational Level: Graduate, Master
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Hughson Ong

Course Description:

Did the New Testament give rise to mission or did mission give rise to the New Testament? Many Christians are inclined to think it is the former but the New Testament itself is a product of mission itself. With this in mind, we begin this course by clarifying some key terms (e.g. missional, hermeneut-ic) before turning to the New Testament documents. Through our study of these and the assessments given the student learns how to approach the New Testament from a missional perspective that apprec- iates it rootedness and relevance in the first-century cultures, its complex story-like unity with the Old Testament, and its multifaceted witness to the climactic nature of Jesus and his work.

How This Course Benefits Students:

This course will enable the student to appreciate and approach the New Testament from a missional perspective and to learn to be sensitive to interpreting it in a rich and theological manner. The student will also discover the coherency of the missional message of the New Testament documents which brings salvation from sin, justice for the poor and oppressed, and ultimately and corporately redemption for the world, including the entire cosmos.

Why This Course Is Important:

Every Christian, regardless of their sphere of service, needs to properly understand that the New Testament is not merely a blueprint for a biblical basis of mission. It is much more than this for these ancient documents evolved from a context of mission, hence a missional hermeneutic provides fresh and innovative ways for us to think about what God in Christ is doing in his world. This does not deny our involvement in the mission of God but it does save us from an anthropocentric approach (i.e., I am going on a short-term mission overseas). What we should be thinking, regardless of the nature of our ministry is, God has already been on a mission for millennia and I am merely joining him as he brings it to completion. Taking this course not only helps us understand the nature of the New Testament documents themselves but to also get our missional priorities right

Educational Level: Upper undergraduate, Bachelor
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Fergus King

Course Description:

Did the New Testament give rise to mission or did mission give rise to the New Testament? Many Christians are inclined to think it is the former but the New Testament itself is a product of mission itself. With this in mind, we begin this course by clarifying some key terms (e.g. missional, hermeneut-ic) before turning to the New Testament documents. Through our study of these and the assessments given the student learns how to approach the New Testament from a missional perspective that appreciates it rootedness and relevance in the first-century cultures, its complex story-like unity with the Old Testament, and its multifaceted witness to the climactic nature of Jesus and his work.

How This Course Benefits Students:

This course will enable the student to appreciate and approach the New Testament from a missional perspective and to learn to be sensitive to interpreting it in a rich and theological manner. The student will also discover the coherency of the missional message of the New Testament documents which brings salvation from sin, justice for the poor and oppressed, and ultimately and corporately redemption for the world, including the entire cosmos.

Why This Course Is Important:

Every Christian, regardless of their sphere of service, needs to properly understand that the New Testament is not merely a blueprint for a biblical basis of mission. It is much more than this for these ancient documents evolved from a context of mission, hence a missional hermeneutic provides fresh and innovative ways for us to think about what God in Christ is doing in his world. This does not deny our involvement in the mission of God but it does save us from an anthropocentric approach (i.e., I am going on a short-term mission overseas). What we should be thinking, regardless of the nature of our ministry is, God has already been on a mission for millennia and I am merely joining him as he brings it to completion. Taking this course not only helps us understand the nature of the New Testament documents themselves but to also get our missional priorities right

Educational Level: Lower undergraduate, Associate
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Hughson Ong

Course Description:

An overview of the content and theology of the New Testament from a missional perspective, utilizing the methodology of missional hermeneutics. The purpose is to discern the missio Dei from the New Testament in order to better understand how the Church is meant to participate in it today. Students will engage the material through readings, lectures, reflective assignments, and discussion forums, and student learning will be assessed by listing, recognizing, and applying key principles from the course in quizzes and tests.

How This Course Benefits Students:

Students will gain a better understanding of the New Testament as a whole and specifically in its witness to the mission of God. This will equip students to recognize and participate in the mission of God in the world, providing them with the appropriate framework for such missionary endeavors as well as the crucial skillset of biblical interpretation for the sake of communicating the gospel in a faithful manner.

Why This Course Is Important:

Understanding the New Testament is crucial to being biblically literate Christians who are informed, from a biblical worldview, about how to do missions faithfully. Discerning the missio Dei from the New Testament is crucial towards that end.

Educational Level: Graduate, Master
Credit Hours: 2 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Steve Winiarski

Course Description:

This introductory course introduces students to the basics of Koine Greek. The course can serve as a stand-alone introduction, but is also intended as preparation for further cumulative study.

How This Course Benefits Students:

Students will be given an opportunity to learn New Testament Greek with the aid and accountability of an instructor who can provide the necessary motivation and encouragement to propel students to succeed in their studies of the language.

Why This Course Is Important:

Understanding the original languages of our Scriptures is vitally important, because it is ultimately in those languages that God has chosen to reveal himself to us. Studying Koine Greek provides students with added confidence and clarity, and helps them better understand how to interpret, translate, and communicate the meaning of the New Testament.

Educational Level: Lower undergraduate, Associate
Credit Hours: 2 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Steve Winiarski

Course Description:

In this course students will be introduced to Koine Greek, including the alphabet, key vocabulary, and basic grammar for the initial study of the language. This course will suffice as an introduction, but is also preparatory for further study.

How This Course Benefits Students:

Students will be given an opportunity to learn New Testament Greek with the aid and accountability of an instructor who can provide the necessary motivation and encouragement to propel students to succeed in their studies of the language.

Why This Course Is Important:

Understanding the original languages of our Scriptures is vitally important, because it is ultimately in those languages that God has chosen to reveal himself to us. Studying Koine Greek provides students with added confidence and clarity, and helps them better understand how to interpret, translate, and communicate the meaning of the New Testament.

Educational Level: Graduate, Master
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Fergus King

Course Description:

Paul is an ancient personality who must first be rooted in the social and historical context of the first century world in order to understand how he went about his work. Some of the more important theological expressions of Paul (e.g., justification) are examined from a missional perspective, followed by concentrating on Pauls missional strategy where we investigate Pauls preference to work alongside a variety of co-workersmale and femalein different locations and at various times as he fulfilled his mandate of apostle to the Gentiles. While we consider these different issues, we also have an eye on major contemporary questions in Pauline studies, including whether Paul expected his communities to be centripetally or centrifugally focused in their missional orientation.

How This Course Benefits Students:

The bachelor level course is intended to help the student understand the theology as well as the realities, strategies and methods Paul employed in his mission. The Masters course assumes some of this knowledge but seeks to extend the students understanding by grappling with the collaborative nature of Pauls missionary work and also engaging key contemporary issues debated by interpreters and miss-iologists alike, including for example, whether the Apostle Paul expected his early Christian comm- unities to evangelize.

Why This Course Is Important:

When most Christians think of Paul, they usually regard him as a letter-writer, pastor or a theologianrarely is Paul considered from the perspective of missionary. In recent years, however, New Testament interpreters have begun to address this neglected dimension to Pauls ministry making this a vital contemporary topic to explore. But Paul was not a missionary in our twenty-first century understanding; rather, he was an apostolic missionary whose theology was nothing less than an out-working of the mission of God whom he loved and served.

Educational Level: Upper undergraduate, Bachelor
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Fergus King

Course Description:

Covers missionary behavior in the book of Acts and other relevant New Testament texts that overlap with the chronology and content of the material recorded in the sequel to Lukes Gospel. Students will engage these biblical patterns for the sake of discerning how the Church ought to emulate the models portrayed in these texts, but also how to engage presently in faithful improvisation for the sake of an ever-changing world. The course will be structured by readings, lectures, discussion forums, group projects, and also an argumentative essay.

How This Course Benefits Students:

Students in this course will be further equipped with the tools and skills necessary for faithful biblical interpretation, for the appropriate application of scripture for missional/ministry purposes, and for the sensitive translation of the gospel across cultural, contextual, social, and ethnic bounds.

Why This Course Is Important:

With the primary focus of this class being on Acts we get to dive into the biblical text that gives us the most insight into the habits, practices, and methods of the earliest form of Christian mission. Acts undoubtedly informs so much of a biblically robust missiology that its very important that we give Acts the attention it deserves.

Educational Level: Upper undergraduate, Bachelor
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Fergus King

Course Description:

An examiniation of Pauls theology and role as apostolic missionary through a consideration of his message, the task, the methods and tactics he employed, and his missional goals. Particular attention will be paid to the missional intent of Pauls theology with an emphasis on its Christ-centered and Spirit-powered nature, as well as a consideration of important practical matters, including how he financed his missional enterprise, his response to suffering, and his urban focus.

How This Course Benefits Students:

The bachelor level course is intended to help the student understand the theology as well as the realities, strategies and methods Paul employed in his mission. The Masters course assumes some of this know-ledge but seeks to extend the students understanding by grappling with the collaborative nature of Pauls missionary work and also engaging key contemporary issues debated by interpreters and miss-iologists alike, including for example, whether the Apostle Paul expected his early Christian comm- unities to evangelize.

Why This Course Is Important:

When most Christians think of Paul, they usually regard him as a letter-writer, pastor or a theologianrarely is Paul considered from the perspective of missionary. In recent years, however, New Testament interpreters have begun to address this neglected dimension to Pauls ministry making this a vital contemporary topic to explore. But Paul was not a missionary in our twenty-first century understanding; rather, he was an apostolic missionary whose theology was nothing less than an out-working of the mission of God whom he loved and served.

Educational Level: Upper undergraduate, Bachelor
Credit Hours: 3 Credits
Instructor: Dr. Fergus King

Course Description:

Focuses on the book of Acts as a witness to the message and methods of the earliest attempts at Christian mission. The goals of the course include discerning what contemporary Christians ought to emulate in modern missionary practice. Assessment will include a range of readings, lectures, discussion forums, group projects, and also a descriptive essay.

How This Course Benefits Students:

Students in this course will be further equipped with the tools and skills necessary for faithful biblical interpretation, for the appropriate application of scripture for missional/ministry purposes, and for the sensitive translation of the gospel across cultural, contextual, social, and ethnic bounds.

Why This Course Is Important:

With the primary focus of this class being on Acts we get to dive into the biblical text that gives us the most insight into the habits, practices, and methods of the earliest form of Christian mission. Acts undoubtedly informs so much of a biblically robust missiology that its very important that we give Acts the attention it deserves.